4 Comments

  1. Irma ruiz
    August 7, 2012 @ 11:19 am

    Hi my name is Irma and I just have a quick question, I am currently going into college and I want to become a Dermatologist but I don’t really know what exactly classes I need for all the years it would help me so much if you can help me. Thank you so much for your time.

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  2. How to Talk About Dropping a Class
    October 24, 2011 @ 2:52 pm

    […] my last post about Asking for Help (it’s the new smart, remember?), I discussed that when students begin to struggle in a class, […]

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  3. Ellen Bremen
    September 29, 2011 @ 9:56 am

    Hi, Millicent,

    I TOTALLY agree that we need to have our students ask as many questions as possible. I’m definitely noticing that those deeper points of inquiry are challenging for students these days. Case in point: When my students work on speech outlines, particularly persuasion, they will often stop once the answers (research) becomes too challenging–and this is usually early on in the content formation stage! I always say, dig deeper, tackle the problem in a number of different ways… or “Ask the librarian!” I believe that the constant questioning is what opens up solutions and Plan A,B,C,D through X!

    I love the idea of the Never Ending Question game and I’m game for that! I’d love to hear more!

    Ellen

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  4. Millicent St. Claire
    September 29, 2011 @ 1:05 am

    Hey Professor! Great article. You hit the nail on the head regarding questions and I have one for you.

    Do you think we should get back to the basics with the socratic method?

    I find that in my accelerated learning classes, I find it necessary to teach a segment on “how to ask questions” as many people have been shut down as children when they heard, “Stop asking so many questions!” Do you think a , a crime was committed in that moment? Hmmm.

    Aren’t we supposed supposed to question EVERYTHING?

    And wasn’t it Einstein who said, “The important thing is to NOT STOP ASKING QUESTIONS?”

    And not just “Who, What, When, Where, Why and How” but also, “Could it be?…Might we?….Is there another way?….If we try this….then what?

    Do you think we should do more to teach our youth to ask deep questions?

    Have you ever played the “Never Ending Question Game?” It both tough and fun and it helps my students. Perhaps we can try it together sometime, eh?

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